Last week in civic tech research: T4T/A boosts government efficiency, govt social media is for broadcasting and 700(!) activism nodes in LatAm

Firstly: policy makers say that readability is the most imp thing for getting your research used for decision-making, + more tips from @fp2p. Just getting that out there.

Findings:

Research on National Integrity Systems in New Zealand and the UK suggest that NIS impact is limited and disparate, while data analysis across 51 countries from 2003-2010, suggests that ICTs, transparency and anti-corruption efforts make government more efficient. Other studies show that gamification of civic tech meetups improves creative problem-solving when the games build empathy instead of rewarding skills, and that internet shutdowns have cost sub-Saharan African countries $235 million. Continue reading “Last week in civic tech research: T4T/A boosts government efficiency, govt social media is for broadcasting and 700(!) activism nodes in LatAm”

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research links w 40,17

Briefly:

European governments are making decisions behind closed doors, according to research by Access Info.  A survey on citizen uptake of a reporting platform (Linz, Austria, n=773) finds mixed results on motivations for participation, but community disconnectedness and previous reporting experience seem strong predictors. A natural experiment with @openstreetmap‏ data suggests that data seeding from external sources is bad for online community development and crowd contributions and @NetChange is running on online survey on non-profit digital engagement strategies. Takes 20 min, help out.

‘s @CourtneyTolmie has evidence-based tips for designing and testing community scorecards, and research from @NJNewsCommons suggests that there are now 6 models for collaborative journalism, distinguished by how sustained and interactive they are.

In other news: water activists are adopting digital techniques, but they’re no match for Chinese bureaucracy , and there’s now a thing called evidence networks.