Government response & citizen participation: newish research promises a lot

The title of a new PAR article from @fsjoberg,@jon_mellon and@participatory implies that it does, but deserves some caveats.

parart-responsiveness-participation Continue reading “Government response & citizen participation: newish research promises a lot”

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research links w 4/17

Papers & Findings

The world is ending. The 2016 Corruption Perceptions Index finds links between corruption and inequality, and notes falling scores for countries around the world. The Economist Intelligence Unit’s Democracy Index is titled Revenge of the “deplorables”, and notes a worsening of the worldwide “democratic recession” in 2016.

Civic techs. What are the most important characteristics for civic apps? Low threshold for use, built in feedback, and visible change and engagement across users. This according to a paper presented at a recent Cambridge conference. Meanwhile, research on Twitter use in the 2016 Ugandan elections finds that the social media platform “provides minority groups important access to public space otherwise denied on traditional media platforms,” and a Yale study suggests that city use of citizen reporting platforms correlate with lower levels of crime, potentially due to increased social cohesion, though the authors are careful not to assert a causal relationship. Continue reading “research links w 4/17”

Book Review: The Global Impact of Open Data

catThe Global Impact of Open Data: Key Findings from Detailed Case Studies Around the World
By Stefaan Verhulst, Andrew Young
Publisher: O’Reilly
Released: September 2016

 

 

 

 

O’Reilly recently released a book documenting GovLab’s case studies on open data impact around the world. Some of the key findings were presented for feedback at the IODC last week, and were forecast in a report released some months ago. This book includes full versions of all 19 country case studies, so weighs in at a whopping 459 pages, daunting for many. Continue reading “Book Review: The Global Impact of Open Data”

The Open Data Research Symposium 2016: summary and issues

Wednesday saw the second Open Data Research Symposium, convened on the sidelines of the International Open Data Conference (and this year’s IODC was a doosie, with side events and opre-events stretching across 5 days different parts of Madrid).  Here is a quick summary of the papers and working groups, followed by some hanging questions and challenges for next year’s Symposium. Continue reading “The Open Data Research Symposium 2016: summary and issues”

Crimes against data, talk by Andrew Gelman

crimesagainstdata_youtube

Andrew Gelmen gives a great talk on how data gets abused in research and politics. He goes a bit into the statistical weeds at times with T & P values and the like, but he’s also a pleasure to listen to. And he gives some great examples of both academics and public figures that either “treat statistics as a means to prove what they already know, or as hoops to be jumped through.” Continue reading “Crimes against data, talk by Andrew Gelman”

What I Learned about Digital Methods

I just attended the digital methods summer school, hosted by University of Amsterdam initiative of the same name. It’s something I’ve wanted to do for years, but first had the opportunity as a phd candidate. It was worth the wait, and here’s a quick summary of what I learned about the methods, the tools, and the course.

The methods

“Digital methods” could mean a lot of different things, but there’s a lot at stake in the rhetoric. Digital humanities, data journalism, webometrics, virtual methods, data science, oh my. Cramming the internet into social science research makes for a complicated landscape, and there’s ontological and political work to be done in how academic schools and approaches distinguish themselves.

Digital methods stakes out its turf with a 2-part move: Continue reading “What I Learned about Digital Methods”